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How Will the CARES Act Change Consumer Bankruptcy?

By: Kate Peterson

The CARES Act, signed into law on March 27th, 2020, intended to provide quick economic assistance to American individuals and businesses. The Act amended the Bankruptcy Code to provide relief to those who file for bankruptcy, with a sunset provision of one year from enactment. In consumer bankruptcies, these changes have implications for both individual debtors and their creditors, who are often businesses of all sizes.

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DARK CLOUDS ON THE HORIZON FOR BIG TECH: PRESIDENT-ELECT BIDEN INHERITS A CULTURAL MOVEMENT CALLING FOR INCREASED ANTITRUST ENFORCEMENT AGAINST TECH MONOPOLISTS

By: William Bassoff

As the next president of the United States, Joe Biden will have a great deal of influence over his administration’s antitrust enforcement. Antitrust enforcement against tech companies’ perceived market power is an increasingly popular idea in the United States. During the current presidency, the Department of Justice and eleven state Attorneys General have brought a civil antitrust suit against Google. Democratic committee members on the House Judiciary Subcommittee on Antitrust recommended sweeping changes to US antitrust laws in order to prosecute Amazon, Apple, Google, and Facebook – perceived tech monopolists. This places the United States in a historic moment for antitrust law, with both political parties clamoring for increased antitrust enforcement against tech giants.

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SHIFTING TIDES: HOW THE AMERICAN RESCUE PLAN ACT OF 2021 PROVIDES FUNDING FOR THE BUSINESS SECTOR

By: Grace Diamond

President Biden signed the American Rescue Plan Act (“Act”) into law in early March 2021 promising impactful relief for many Americans from the coronavirus pandemic. The Act provides fourteen hundred dollar checks and an extension of unemployment benefits to eligible Americans. More substantially, the Act provides tens of billions of dollars of aid for businesses. But who is actually covered, how does this relief Bill differ from prior pieces of legislation and what does it mean for business owners across the country? Essentially, this Act, unlike its predecessors, is narrowly tailored towards specific industries and begins phasing out generally available relief funding for the business sector.

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In re Grand Jury Proceeding: Insights into Discovery in Corporate Criminal Investigation

By: Jacob Stock
The facts underlying In re: Grand Jury Proceeding read as well as any legal thriller: Felix Sater, a man wrapped up in fraud and racketeering for the mob, becomes an informant for the feds and helps to track down US law enforcement’s most wanted. Hot on his tail is Frederick Oberlander, a lawyer working hard for his clients to recover the funds lost in Sater’s former schemes. As Oberlander works the cases, however, he discovers information related to Sater’s cooperation with the government is sealed, and the Second Circuit enjoins Oberlander from publicly disclosing the information. Frustrated by the red tape, Oberlander releases the information anyway, resulting in several grand juries being impaneled to initiate a criminal investigation.

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WE NEED TO TALK.

By: Alexa Weber

In The Federal Trade Commission (“FTC”) has sued Match Group, Inc. (“Match”) for allegedly tricking individuals to subscribe to Match.com, an online dating service, through fraudulent advertising, deceptive business practices, and unfair denial of access to subscriber accounts. Match controls about one-quarter of the online dating market and owns approximately 45 separate online dating services, including Match.com, OKCupid, Tinder, and PlentyOfFish.

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LIABILITY MACHINES

By: Nick Kandas

This week (February 25, 2020) in Personalized Media Communications LLC v. Google LLC, Judge Rodney Gilstrap of the United States District Court of the Eastern District of Texas asked the parties to provide briefing on the impact of a federal circuit decision on this case. Personalized Media Communications responded by writing that machines, in this case servers, are agents of Google. Unpacking how Personalized Media arrived at this incredulous claim requires a quick and exciting dip into the world of patent venue.

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EVICTION MORATORIUMS: GREAT FOR TENANTS, DISASTROUS FOR “MOM AND POP” LANDLORDS

BY: MOHAMAD ALI ABDALLAH

“Here I am expected to absorb everybody else’s heartaches … and nobody’s there to resolve to my heartache,” said Terri Lacy, a “mom and pop” landlord affected by state eviction moratoriums that temporarily absolve tenants of rent, but not landlords of their mortgage payments. When the coronavirus pandemic reached American soil, it resulted in not only a health care crisis, but an economic crisis and a housing crisis. As the economy collapsed and people started losing their jobs, people became fearful that they would not have the money to pay rent, and would lose their houses.

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DO BUSINESSES NEED TO BE ESSENTIAL?

By: Grace Michele Duval

During the COVID-19 pandemic, social distancing and the close of “non-essential” businesses mark a new normal in American public life. The dictionary defines essential as “absolutely necessary, indispensable.”[1] Essential has yet to become a legal term of art concerning classification of corporate entities but there has been some guidance.

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